Welcome!

Commenting on Software Technology Trends & Market Dynamics

Jnan Dash

Subscribe to Jnan Dash: eMailAlertsEmail Alerts
Get Jnan Dash via: homepageHomepage mobileMobile rssRSS facebookFacebook twitterTwitter linkedinLinkedIn


Related Topics: Cloud Computing, Startup Journal, Venture Capital

Blog Feed Post

The Saga of the Unicorns | @CloudExpo #IoT #BigData #Microservices

There are signs the 'lofty valuations' of these unicorn are cooling

Unicorn is a term in the investment industry, and in particular the venture capital industry, which denotes a start-up company whose valuation has exceeded (the somewhat arbitrary) $1 billion. The term has been popularized by Aileen Lee of Cowboy Ventures. Fortune magazine counted over 80 unicorns as of January 2015. Now its most likely past 100. But their journey lately has been bumpy.

There are signs the "lofty valuations" of these unicorns are cooling. Fidelity wrote down Dropbox by 20%; Snapchat by 25%; and Zenefits and MongoDB by around 50% each. Zenefits had raised money at a $4.5B valuation in May. The reason for the markdown is the slow growth in meeting their targets. Square, which had its IPO earlier in November, was valued at $4 billion, about a third less than in its most recent private round. Several others besides Square have faced "markdowns" -  Pure Storage, Box, GoPro, News Relic, Hottonworks, etc.

What is going on? Some of it is due to stock market jitteriness. Some of the unicorns claim to be disruptive and a threat to the incumbents. This has not happened. Google, Facebook, and Amazon have continued to grow impressively. Facebook has messaging apps that compete with Snapchat and Dropbox has a rival in Amazon with a fast-growing cloud storage business. MongoDB claimed to disrupt Oracle's business, but Oracle's stock has been growing lately. Investors clearly see that profitless startups may not be as good as incumbents' growth prospects. Also, the burn rates of the unicorns are way too high. Lyft suffered a loss of $130M during the first half of this year on less that $50M in revenue. Instacart is losing $10 on each order. Open source software companies like Cloudera, MongoDB or Cassandra have a tough time growing their revenue.

Also, there seems to be a competition to pump up the valuation of these unicorns. The velocity to get into the "unicorn club" is too high. New fundraising rounds get creative to boost the valuation with investors. There are too many companies in similar spaces, each claiming to be $20-30 billion dollar companies in future. This is not going to happen. In the past downturns, healthy and well-capitalized firms have benefited. Airbnb has $2 billion in cash with a burn rate of around $100M a year.  Those firms that hoarded up cash during good times for the downturn will do well.

So unicorns, watch out before you become history.

More Stories By Jnan Dash

Jnan Dash is Senior Advisor at EZShield Inc., Advisor at ScaleDB and Board Member at Compassites Software Solutions. He has lived in Silicon Valley since 1979. Formerly he was the Chief Strategy Officer (Consulting) at Curl Inc., before which he spent ten years at Oracle Corporation and was the Group Vice President, Systems Architecture and Technology till 2002. He was responsible for setting Oracle's core database and application server product directions and interacted with customers worldwide in translating future needs to product plans. Before that he spent 16 years at IBM. He blogs at http://jnandash.ulitzer.com.